Teaching Brecht

Here are my slides and an accompanying YouTube video of me chatting away about Bertolt Brecht. Some of it might be of interest to those currently teaching and/or studying Brecht’s theatrical theory and practice. I hope some of you find it to be of use! Plus if you spot any “deliberate” mistakes please alert me … More Teaching Brecht

Whose Cultural Capital?

“[educationl is in fact one of the most effective means of perpetuating the existing social pattern, as it both provides an apparent justification for social inequalities and gives recognition to the cultural heritage, that is, to a social gift treated as a natural one.” (Bourdieu, 1974, p. 32) Education maintains inequality. Bourdieu argues that in … More Whose Cultural Capital?

Knowledge Belongs to the Many, Not the Few

Angela Rayner’s speech to the Labour Party conference contained many interesting ideas. The National Education Service, of course, echoes the UK’s beloved NHS: The next Labour Government will create a National Education Service, a cradle-to-grave system supporting everyone throughout their lives. It would start in the early years, where we know it has the most … More Knowledge Belongs to the Many, Not the Few

Creating a Classroom Culture: The ‘Centre’

Every subject is different, it has its own rhythms and constraints around which a positive classroom culture can be created. Getting changed for PE, putting on lab coats, getting out exercise books and pens, all these seemingly mundane rituals are an essential part of creating a positive working atmosphere. In the drama room I have … More Creating a Classroom Culture: The ‘Centre’

The Future Fallacy

Most people know nothing about learning; many despise it. Dummies reject as too hard whatever is not dumb.   Thomas More, Utopia The future fallacy occurs when someone makes a comment about what the future will be like and then says: ‘therefore we should be doing (insert something here)…’ The 21st century skills argument is exactly … More The Future Fallacy